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More information - Scholes Coppice & Bray Plantation
  visiting the wood
  landforms, rocks and soils
  history and heritage
  plants and trees
  vegetation
  birds and animals
  educational use
  woodland restoration and
   management work

SCHOLES COPPICE AND BRAY PLANTATION
ROTHERHAM

To download a map and trail leaflet click here.

The two woodlands of Scholes Coppice and Bray Plantation lie close together on the edge of the Kimberworth Park housing estate, four kilometres north-west of the centre of Rotherham.

Scholes Coppice, the larger of two woodlands, is a well-documented ancient woodland, which once formed part of the Kimberworth Deer Park. It contains several features of archaeological interest, most notably Caesar's Camp, one of the best preserved Iron Age forts in South Yorkshire. The woodland is also bounded by large woodbanks which are, in places, topped by drystone walls.

Although replanted at least once with non-native trees such as Beech, Sycamore and Sweet Chestnut, Scholes Coppice continues to support a diverse flora and fauna, including over twenty plants characteristic of ancient woodlands. Animals include two species of bat, a number of significant invertebrates, and a good range of woodland birds.

Bray Plantation, as its name suggests, is not an ancient woodland. It is however of considerable interest as it contains many prominent mounds, these being the spoil heaps from 'bell pits' used in the past for shallow coal mining.

Scholes Coppice
A woodland path in Scholes Coppice.

Although replanted at least once with areas of non-native trees such as Beech, Sycamore and Sweet Chestnut, Scholes Coppice continues to support a diverse flora and fauna, including over twenty plants characteristic of ancient woodlands. These include Yellow Pimpernel, Wood Sorrel and Broadleaved Helleborine, a relatively uncommon species in the Rotherham area. Animals include two species of bat, a number of significant invertebrates, and a good range of woodland birds, including Tawny Owl, Great-spotted Woodpecker and Treecreeper.

Bray Plantation, lies a short way to the south and is a small but well used area of woodland. As its name suggests, is not an ancient woodland, having been established sometime in the early years of the 19th century. It is however of considerable interest as it contains many prominent mounds, the spoil heaps from 'bell pits' used in the past for shallow coal and ironstone mining. The main trees in Bray Plantation are Oaks and Sycamores.

Being situated between the edge of Rotherham and the open countryside, both woodlands are, along with the adjacent wildflower-rich grassland of Keppel's Field, important landscape features and popular places for both formal and informal recreation. There is a good network of well-used paths, as well as some bridleways. Together with the adjacent grassland area of Keppel's Field, the two woodlands also form an excellent educational resource.


Other nearby Heritage Woodlands are: